How To Treat Panic Attacks In Hashimoto Thyroiditis Patients?

To really understand how to treat panic attacks in Hashimoto thyroiditis patients or any other specific patient category, it is essential to know just what the pre-existing/chronic condition is. So, in this situation, it is crucial to give plenty of time and space to understanding Hashimoto thyroiditis, its causes and symptoms.

We can immediately connect the general field of thyroiditis with anxiety conditions because medical reports show that hypothyroidism is related to anxiety and is even considered a cause of anxiety events. Some doctors even report that Hashimoto thyroiditis inquiries make up a huge portion of the questions about anxiety conditions.

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis directly involves the body’s autoimmune system and can be uncovered by blood tests that show particular antibodies in the thyroid gland. These antibodies are known to attack and kill cells in this important gland. Unfortunately, the body’s immune system moves to attack the thyroid gland itself, as if it was an unwanted virus or bacteria.

Individual’s who have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis develop a toxic condition that usually leads to a true panic attack. Doctors who have focused on this condition and associated it with psychological changes in patients know that anxiety is very common among Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. This condition is usually found in people between the ages of 45 and 65.

But what can Hashimoto’s sufferers do? How can they be treated for panic attack in the most effective way? The first step is to make sure that thyroiditis is diagnosed and that treatment for this is started immediately. In some cases, the specific treatment of the thyroid condition reduces or eliminates some of the symptoms associated with panic attack. Doctors commonly prescribe specific thyroid medications that help level hormones in the gland. This is a crucial first step.

Doctors have been able to prescribe medications for anxiety and panic episodes even while treatment for the thyroid condition is being fine-tuned. How To Treat Panic Attacks In Hashimoto Thyroiditis PatientsThe process might take several weeks or even a few months. Sometimes a anti-depressant is prescribed for those with anxiety disorders or panic attacks. These help many patients by reducing symptoms and/or eliminating symptoms. If these medications don’t work, more specific anti-anxiety medications may be necessary.

Hypothyroidism is usually treated with hormone-replacement therapy. It is generally necessary to continue this throughout the patient’s life. In many cases this program relieves the symptoms. Hypothyroidism is sometimes misdiagnosed as depression, abnormal fatigue, and many other conditions with similar symptoms. If Hashimoto’s thyroidism is accompanied by occasion spikes or events of hyperthyroidism this can be misdiagnosed as well. Patients usually take a daily tablet to stabilize thyroid hormone levels. Doctors attempt to keep the hormone level rather low in Hashimoto’s thyroiditis patients. In most cases, doctors can treat the thyroid condition and symptoms of panic attack at the same time. But anytime medications are mixed, especially for such closely related maladies, extreme caution is necessary. As mentioned earlier, it is essential that they thyroid condition be diagnosed and treated immediately.

Category: Mental Health

One Comment on “How To Treat Panic Attacks In Hashimoto Thyroiditis Patients?”


alison wrote:

My 16 year old son has been diagnosed with anxiety panic attacks followed by depression. He has also been diagnosed with Hashimottos, with antibodies greater than 1300…but his thyroid function is normal. Could the Hashimotos be causing the aniety/panic attacks/depression. Please help us, I am at a loss, the anti depressants that he was put on did not work, he is now weaning off and has to start on Zoloft. I do not want to give him meds that aren’t going to help, if it is the thyroid causing the trouble.

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