When Was The Titanic Built?

The construction on the Titanic began on 31 March, 1909 at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast in Northern Ireland, the United Kingdom. It took almost two years to complete the construction of the hull and after the final touches the ship was ready on 31 March, 1912.

The official name of the Titanic was RMS Titanic (RMS = Royal Mail Ship) and it was an Olympic class ocean liner, which means that it was one of the three largest and most luxurious and largest ships of her time made at the Harland and Wolff shipyard. The construction of the ship was financed by an American financer J. P. Morgan. His aim was to monopolize the shipping trade and his company, International Mercantile Marine Company, was also a major investor. The ship was approximately 270 meters in length and it was 28 meters wide. The ship had 9 decks and its height was 53.3 meters. The RMS Titanic could cruise at a speed of 43 km/h or 23 knots and it could carry about 3,500 passengers.
titanicThe Titanic set off on her maiden voyage to New York, the United States on 10 April, 1912. Just four days later on 14 April, 1912 it hit an iceberg on the way and sank in the Atlantic Ocean. It was one of the most technologically advanced ships of her era and its sinking was much publicized. There were not enough life boats and this caused a number of unnecessary deaths. An expedition team under the guidance of Jean-Louis Michel, a French oceanographer, discovered the wreck of Titanic on 1 September, 1985. Approximately 6,000 artifacts have been removed from the ship and now are displayed in different museums around the world (mostly in England). The rediscovery also caused a new controversy about who owns the artifacts and the matter is still unsettled.

Category: History, Government & Society

One Comment on “When Was The Titanic Built?”


melony greenwood wrote:

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