Look at me cars are not just cars, contrary to what many may think. More commonly known as LAM cars, this actually seems to be a social phenomenon with outrageous and beautiful vehicles at its core.

First and foremost, those who are taking part in the LAM phenomenon are running for all their worth after being cool and being included. Whether your favorite car is blue, red or multi-colored, whether it’s a hatchback, tricked-out truck or a sleek ride meant for cruising, you can establish a presence with the right vehicle-based graphics.

As the old hippies said some 40 years ago, it’s a happening, similar in function to MySpace, Facebook and many other interaction communities that have exploded on the World Wide Web.

Wait, maybe it’s more than that. Maybe it’s a way to make your MySpace, Facebook or personal site more you (as defined by the head-turning car in the photo).

The question is: What kind of car yells out “look at me.” According to those who responded, a cruiser leads the way, with street truck, off-road truck and lowrider occupying lesser status. For some, a Hummer still cries out for attention.

But whatever the individual choice, there seems to be a movement that might just rival the car-phenomenon of the 1950s and 1960s. During that time, a guy was judged not by the company he kept, but by the wheels he was seen in at the drive-in or the local malt shop. In the new world, it’s not just the guys, but most definitely the girls too, making their personal statement.

Fast forward to the world of Internet communication, personal Web pages and desktop publishing, and we have a whole new “thing.” One example even has construction workers hollering about the great vintage vehicle being driven by an attractive gal, rather than commenting on her chassis.

In this simmering world of interest in cars and the statement they make, the variety can be staggering. There is a growing interest in making personal spaces scream about Disney/Pixar cars. Others will find their paradise (and hope others find them) with the old but newly cool Cadillac theme.
Don’t forget about those Barracudas, Road Runners and 396-driven Camaros. The Web’s muscle car community is growing. Maybe it’s just expanding from the old grease monkeys and drag fiends to become the Internet’s version of the favorite T—shirt. In the same everybody-welcome mode, you can also share a video of your favorite car even if heads turn because it’s a clunker and you happen to be standing on the hood as it rolls down the street.

What’s behind this interest in getting people to notice “me and my car?” One blogger proposes it’s because major car companies don’t know how to make one car look different from another. Another fellow expresses his cynicism by saying that, since people don’t have real life, they live it through their cars. Who knows? It’s happening anyway.


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Lucas Beaumont
Generalist. Wikipedia contributor. Elementary school teacher from Saskatchewan, Canada.

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