(1) The Masai Mara: Also spelled as Maasai Mara, it is the largest National Reserve in Africa and most of mara (roughly a ‘park’ in the local language) falls in Kenya. It is a continuation of Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. It is the only area in the world where you can witness the migration of more than a million wildebeests, and it is one of those major facts which make Masai Mara the most popular tourist destination in Africa. Most of the national reserve is primarily open grasslands. There are a number of lodges and tented camps for the tourists and Masai Mara is a major source of hard currency for Kenya.

(2) Victoria Falls: This one and a half mile water fall is located between the boundaries of Zambia and Zimbabwe in South Africa. It is on the Zambezi River and during the wet season it generates such huge amounts of water spray that the spray shoots can be seen as far as 50 kilometres. Because of this the locals also call it Mosi oa Tunya (Smoke that thunders). The best time to visit the Victoria Falls is during the rainy season and it is now a UNESCO World Heritage. It is estimated that around 300, 000 people visit the Victoria Falls annually.

(3) The Great Pyramids of Giza: For over two thousand years the Great Pyramids were the tallest buildings in the world. The Great Pyramids are nothing but big tombs made for the kings of ancient Egypt. The pyramids are situated just outside the capital city of Cairo in Egypt. The pyramids were built around 5000 years ago and contrary to the popular conception, there are a number of pyramids in the area, also known as the Valley of the Kings, but only a couple of them are known because of their big size. Each pyramid is the tomb of a different king.

(4) Djenné: It is a small town in the sub-Saharan African nation of Mali and the town is declared a UNESCO World Heritage since 1988. The history this one of the oldest towns in the sub-Saharan Africa is closely linked to another town, Timbuktu. Both towns became centres of Muslim scholarship during the 15th and the 16th centuries and with the advent of the Portuguese, the towns prospered. Today, tourism plays an important role for the local economy. A market is held in the town on every Monday and it is one of the most African and lively markets in the region.

(5) Cape Town: This largest city in South Africa in located on the shore of Table Bay in Western Cape. The city is South Africa’s most popular tourist destination. The town was originally developed as a supply station by the Dutch East India Company and soon it became the business and cultural hub of the Cape Colony. It is still one of the most multicultural cities with a “big potential for business expansions” according to expatcapetown.com. The natural beauty of the city also makes it one of the most attractive cities in the world with some of the most beautiful beaches which are ideal for surfing. The city is also noted for its architectural appearance and its Mediterranean atmosphere always seems to welcome the tourists.

(6) Marrakech: Also spelled as Marrakech, it used to be the former imperial city in Morocco and like many modern North African cities the city is divided into two parts: the fortified city (also known as ‘old city’) and a modern city. The city also boasts of one of the largest traditional markets in Morocco and the busiest squares. Most of the tourists like to stay in the old city to know the city in depth. The food stalls and open air restaurants are a major tourist attraction. Majorelle Gardens in the city is famous for its serene atmosphere.

(7) Omo River Region: The home of more than 50 indigenous tribes; the region is captivating for any one interested in the real African culture. It is a remote location in Ethiopia and this remoteness has its own advantages: it has kept the customs and traditions of the natives virtually intact. It is not really uncommon to find the natives moving around with AK-47s hung on their shoulders but, according to the experts, these people are generally friendly. Omo River region is not for you if you are looking forward to some luxurious vacations.

(8) Virunga Mountains: It is a chain of mountainous volcanoes in East Africa along the northern borders of Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Most of the volcanoes in mountain range are not active, and the Virunga Mountains are home to many endangered species of wildlife including the mountain gorillas. Karisimbi is the highest peak of the mountains and it is 4,507 meters high.

(9) Mount Kilimanjaro: It is world’s tallest free standing mountain whose height 5896 is meters. The mountain comprises of three volcanic cones, Shira, Mawenzi and Kibo. It is located in Tanzania and Uhuru peak is the highest peak at 19,341 feet. An exciting fact about the mountain is that it can be climbed without any special climbing equipment or much expertise.

(10) Zanzibar: With its proximity to the Indian Ocean, Zanzibar used to be (and still is) a major trading location for the merchants passing by. The biggest island of the Zanzibar Archipelago is called Unguja or simply Zanzibar. The archipelago joined Tanzania in 1964 but still enjoys a good degree of autonomy. Although Zanzibar’s economy is mainly based on the production of cloves, tourism still plays a major part. Incredible beaches, the stone town (built by the Arab rulers) and the traditional houses are major tourist attractions.


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Lucas Beaumont
Generalist. Wikipedia contributor. Elementary school teacher from Saskatchewan, Canada.

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