Some people might feel that the answer to this question has been decided and there is no reason to debate it any longer. Those who believe that dogs eat grass because of indigestion or other stomach problems might be satisfied with that answer and leave it there.

It’s common knowledge that some dogs seem to do this on a regular basis while other members of the canine family don’t chew or eat grass at all. Some dogs seem to down a mouthful of grass then vomit it back up. Others don’t do this, but may nibble on one or two blades of grass.

So, What’s the answer?

There might actually be two answers. Dogs may just chew on grass and swallow small amounts because they like it. They might like the taste or the feel of the grass in their mouths. If they swallow it in small amounts they may not show any signs of sickness or vomiting at all. These dogs usually don’t gobble huge amounts of grass as if they were starving. The activity is more like a pastime or a comfortable habit.

It’s a safe bet that these dogs don’t need grass or fiber to supplement their diets. They just don’t consume enough to make a difference in the diet or in digestion of their regular food. A few pet owners have even reported that their dogs enjoy other green vegetables, so grass may just be something the dogs prefer to eat.

The second type of grass-eating activity might be worth a more serious look. If a dog eats larger amounts of grass on consistent basis that pet might actually be lacking something in the diet. Some veterinarians believe this is true while others simply consider grass-eating a harmless activity. The answer here may be in how much grass your dog eats and what effect it has.

There is some support for giving the dog cooked, green vegetables in addition to any regular diet or commercial food. This may be the simple answer if the pet seems to prefer something green. If the dog stops eating grass or eats a lot less grass after vegetables are included in the diet, you may have found the answer to your dilemma. *Raw vegetables are probably not a good idea and may cause more problems, such as vomiting.

There is one more factor to consider in the grass-eating story. Many modern lawns have been treated with chemicals, including those that are designed to kill insect pests or certain types of grass and weeds. These may harm your dog. It’s always good to check with the veterinarian. Read the chemical instructions and guidelines carefully before applying them. If there is a possibility of a pet eating recently treated grass, take them to another area of the lawn or to the park, for example.

If you have had your pet for awhile and the dog suddenly begins eating grass and vomiting it’s probably time to consult with your trusted veterinarian. Common sense is always best when trying to determine why a dog eats grass.


Like it? Share with your friends!

Lucas Beaumont
Generalist. Wikipedia contributor. Elementary school teacher from Saskatchewan, Canada.

0 Comments